ECU's JACOBS RECEIVES GUGGENHEIM FELLOWSHIP

School of Music professor becomes first ECU Guggenheim fellow

East Carolina University School of Music composition and theory professor Edward Jacobs has received a prestigious Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. The foundation recognized Jacobs on April 4 for his work as a composer.

Granted by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Guggenheim Fellowships are intended for individuals who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. The fellowship is designed to assist in research in any field of knowledge and creation in any of the arts under the freest possible conditions.

Jacobs is the first ECU faculty member to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship, which will support the completion of several commissioned works of original music. Approximately 170 fellows were chosen from more than 3,000 applicants last year.

“It is a great honor to be named a Guggenheim Fellow, and I am deeply grateful to the Guggenheim Foundation and to the performers, composers and colleagues who have offered such vital support of my creative work,” Jacobs said. “Composers depend on those who breathe life into their work, and I have been very fortunate to collaborate with remarkable performers in many different contexts.”

Jacobs has written music for instruments, voices and electronic media in settings including soloist, chamber ensemble, orchestra, concerto and choir. His music has been heard in performances in the U.S., Europe and Asia, and is recorded on the Open G, Innova and (forthcoming 2019) Ablaze record labels. He is published by C.F. Peters Corp., the Association for Promotion of New Music and the American Composers Alliance.

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Originally published March 5, 2018. Written by Harley Dartt.

 

 

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