FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 2, 2018

Statement from UNC System President Margaret Spellings on Federal Disaster Assistance for Students

CHAPEL HILL, NC – UNC System President Margaret Spellings released the following statement in response to the awarding of $2.8 million by the U.S. Department of Education in grants to financially needy college students affected by Hurricane Florence:

“These grants are greatly needed and will go a long way in assisting students that can least afford to bear the devastating costs caused by Hurricane Florence,” said President Spellings. “We will continue to work with state and federal officials to ensure all of our affected students receive the support they need to recover in order to successfully continue their educational pursuits.”

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced earlier today that the supplemental funds are being made available from Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG). The grant money targets 38 institutions located in counties in North and South Carolina designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency for individual or public assistance as a result of the hurricane.

UNC System institutions included Fayetteville State University, which received $197,528, the University of North Carolina Wilmington, which received $61,147, the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, which received $183,550, and East Carolina University, which received $330,718.

The UNC Board of Governors also approved a proposal that will allow UNC Wilmington to adjust its academic calendar by waiving up to 200 minutes of instructional time for a typical class. UNC Wilmington’s plan also includes canceling its upcoming fall break, canceling a “reading day” prior to final exams, lengthening classes by five minutes and providing additional interactions between teachers and students via online platforms.

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

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